Posted in aesthetics games play

“What if…?”:

What if we just took the “what if?” state of mind to be playing? I find I really need a definition, and this is both simple and versatile (I can’t be the only one who…

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Posted in Apparatus photography

What can’t be photographed

The photographs sent back to earth from Mars have a kind of “signature,” something that both acknowledges the colossal technical achievement of the mission and clearly signals its photographic limits. In particular, many of the…

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Posted in aesthetics

Honeywell

At the September meeting of Telltales (writing group based in Falmouth), I read “Honeywell”, a short piece about the Minneapolis company now gone global.  It was a response to the theme chosen for that session,…

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Posted in fiction

Writing and Digging

  My first reading at Telltales (the writers group in Falmouth–see last post) was called “Daisies”.  It’s pretty much a description of something that happened to me–hard to say exactly when, but within the past…

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Posted in photography

The Blind Photographer

I recently reviewed this book (in Source: The Photographic Review 87).  The information–both the images and the slight details about the photographers–is more than sufficient to provoke a rethinking of vision itself.  I would have…

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Posted in Flusser translation

True Translation

Translation was such an integral part of Flusser’s writing practice that it seems intrusive to translate again, or to translate what he did not.  He was not in any way reassuring about the issue either:  “…I…

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Posted in aesthetics translation

The Visibility of the Image

I am pleased to be the translator of this, the second edition of Lambert Wiesing’s Die Sichtbarkeit des Bildes.  The book, first published in 1996,  draws on the history of formal aesthetics to present an introduction…

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Posted in Flusser habit ritual

Flusser and Habits

Flusser uses the word “habit” [Gewohnheit] almost exclusively to mean something that is not conscious, something that in fact obscures or inhibits conscious reflection.  He frequently referred to habits as “veils,” obscuring possibilities of thinking…

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